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The Preppers Guide to Making and Storing Coffee

Without power, there won’t be any Unicorn Frappuccinos.

Hello all! This is Rob Raskin of Las Vegas, here to bring you Part Three of my three-part series on what you’ll need to keep coffee in your daily routine after TEOTWAWKI.

After a catastrophic event, coffee will become a scarce commodity. Once you run out, you may be out for good. Even if you manage to find some coffee beans, they won’t do you any good if you don’t know how to property make and store coffee.

In this final entry in my coffee series, I’ll be discussing various ways you’ll be able to make coffee without Mr. Coffee’s help—and even if you don’t have a grinder. I’m also going to go over proper coffee storage techniques. Can you imagine how devastated you’d be if your coffee stash developed mold or other problems that made it unfit for consumption or for trade?

Don’t worry, you’re about to learn the ins and outs of coffee prep and storage for survivalists, so your coffee will be fine.

 

Can You Brew Coffee Without a Coffee Maker?

No coffee maker? No problem, because there are plenty of other ways you can enjoy your morning cup of coffee. Here are two that’ll have you awake, alert, and ready to face the day.

 

Pan Method

You can make coffee using nothing more than a pan, water, and ground coffee. Simply add the amount of water you need to the pan, adding just a little extra water. Once the water is boiling, add the amount of coffee you normally use. Remove your pan from your heat source and cover it. After five minutes, ladle the coffee off the top, being careful to leave the grounds that are settled below undisturbed. It really is that easy!

 

Whole Bean Method

This method takes longer because the purpose of a grinder is to break coffee beans down into smaller particles to speed up the brewing process. If you find yourself in a situation in which you have the time to relax, consider giving whole bean coffee a try. It’s worth the wait because the flavor is simply incredible. To make it, get a mason jar with 3 oz. markings and a lid. You’ll want to add one cup of hot water to the jar to start. Put a pot of water on your heat source, then place the mason jar inside it, filling it until the water level matches the level in the jar. Simmer for one hour, then carefully remove the jar, making sure to protect your hands because it’s going to be extremely hot. Pour the coffee out of the jar, and what you’ll have is the best-tasting cup of coffee of your life.

 

Can You Grind Coffee Without a Grinder?

You can grind coffee without a grinder using these four methods:

  • Rolling pin – Put the beans in a freezer bag, then place the bag between towels to protect it. Roll your rolling pin across the towels using enough force to break them into small pieces.
  • Hammer – Prepare your beans the same way you would to roll them, and use a hammer, mallet, meat tenderizer, or other blunt object to crush them, making sure they’re protected in a bag and between towels first.
  • Blender – If you have a generator, you can use your blender to grind coffee beans on the pulse setting.
  • Mortar and pestle – This one is self-explanatory. You won’t need any other equipment, but be prepared to spend a lot of time grinding your beans in a mortar and pestle.

 

How to Store Your Coffee

There is no one “right” way to store coffee, and many preppers swear their own method is the best. The truth is, their method probably is what is best for them, because no one’s situation is the same so we all may need to adjust our expectations after TEOTWAWKI. Some preppers prefer to buy canned coffee, which you can safely store in any cool, dry, dark place. You can also store beans in a root cellar. Just make sure you dig it as deeply as possible to keep the beans fresh.

 

One method many preppers swear by is storing green coffee beans and pan roasting it before use. The benefit of this is the green beans will keep longer, so there’s less risk. Like brewing whole-bean coffee, this is also something you’ll only want to consider if you’re sure you have the time, as pan roasting your beans every time is a lengthy process.

 

The best time to perfect your off-grid coffee making technique is now, while the grid is still operational, because you won’t have time to learn in a crisis situation. Remember what I always say: BE PREPARED.

Learn more about storing coffee now and after the SHTF.

 

Three ways to make coffee in the woods.

Can You Make Coffee Without Beans?

When the SHTF, you may just have to brew with what you’ve got. Here’s how.

Hello everyone! Rob Raskin of Las Vegas here again, and this week I want to talk about something most of us begin our day with—coffee. Have you ever thought about what survival might look like if you didn’t have that cup o’ Joe in the morning? In a survival situation, you might not have any choice. Once you run out of coffee, unless you know someone who still has some left and you have something to trade for it, you’re going to be out of luck. It’s never too soon to learn the basics of coffee substitutes.

Coffee substitutes are nothing new. Even the Mayans brewed a coffee-like beverage using ramón seeds. Today, there are plenty of fancy coffee substitute beverages on the market made of alternative ingredients like cocoa beans, mushrooms, barley, and chicory. In Poland, a coffee substitute that is similar to our instant coffee yet made of instant grains is popular. But for most of us, it’s unlikely you’re going to bug-out in Poland.

If you’re in Hawaii, you can grow your own coffee beans. If you’re in the mainland US, you’re going to have to come up with a substitute once the existing coffee supply runs out. After TEOTWAWKI, there will be no websites or Whole Foods to buy those exotic substitutes, either. You’ll have to brew your coffee substitute yourself, using ingredients that are naturally occurring in your environment.

A group of scientists studied the pistachio to see if they might be a healthier alternative to traditional coffee, and the results of that study were promising. This was largely in part to the pistachio’s powerful antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Some people choose to drink coffee made of roasted grains for health reasons, as these beverages do not contain caffeine. After a catastrophic event or social collapse, you’ll need to be in peak condition if you want to survive. The health properties of these drinks are worth considering. You can drink as much of these coffee substitutes as you’d like without the jitteriness you’ll experience if you drink a pot of coffee.

The following coffee substitutes might not taste exactly like the coffee you’re used to, but it’s better than no coffee at all. Some people actually prefer the taste of coffee substitutes. You’ll never know if you like it or not until you give it a try. Continue reading to learn how to make coffee out of two ingredients that are commonly found in the United States: acorns and dandelions.

 

How to Make Acorn Coffee

Wherever you find oak trees, you’ll find acorns. Wherever you find acorns, you will find people who are using them as food. Keep in mind, however, that not all varieties of acorns are safe for human consumption. Before you eat an acorn, you’ll need to know that it’s edible for human consumption. It’s best to do your research now and familiarize yourself with the types of acorns you’ll find in your area.

Ingredients

  • A few handfuls of acorns
  • Knife
  • Grinder or mortar and pestle
  • Purified water
  • Baking sheet
  • Grill

 

Directions

The first thing you’ll need to do is boil the acorns for approximately 20 minutes, then let them cool down. Once they’ve cooled, peel the shell away, and next peel the skin. Split the acorns in half and then lay them in the sun to dry for a day. Once the moisture has been removed and they’re completely dry, you’ll need to grind them. Once they are very finely ground, put the grounds on a baking sheet and make sure they’re spread out evenly. To roast them, place the baking sheet under your brill. Be sure to keep an eye on the grounds as they’re roasting, because they’ll burn easily.

To make the grounds into coffee, brew three tablespoons of the roasted grounds in a cup of boiling water. You can filter the grounds out using a wire mesh screen or, if you’re lucky enough to have any, coffee filters. As you can see, there’s really no difference between this process and making any other kind of coffee.

 

How to Make Dandelion Coffee

Dandelion root coffee is said to taste similar to coffee made with traditional coffee beans. This coffee substitute is a natural diuretic, and one major benefit it offers is a strengthened immune system. Staying healthy is a literal matter of life or death in a survival situation, so that’s a huge plus.

Harvesting dandelion roots is a lot more work than picking acorns up from under an oak tree, that’s for sure, but once you’ve tasted this coffee substitute you may agree it’s worth the effort. The trick is to harvest your dandelions in the early spring, before they flower. Once they do, the roots will become bitter.

 

Ingredients

  • 15 dandelions with the roots still attached
  • Knife
  • Baking sheet
  • Oven
  • Purified water

 

Directions

Cut the roots from the dandelions, and then cut off all smaller parts of the roots until only the bulkier root stalk remains. Spread the root stalk pieces out across a baking sheet and bake in a 400-degree oven. If you don’t have access to an oven, you can roast these under your grill as well. You’ll want to roast them for 30 minutes, keeping a close eye on them to make sure they brown but don’t burn.

With dandelion root coffee, you can skip the grinder. This brews more like a tea. Simply steep the pieces in a cup of boiling water until it’s as strong as you like it.

Check back next week for Part Three of my three-part series, when I’m going to take a closer look at ways to safely store your coffee and how you can brew coffee in the wild.