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A Toast to Wilderness Cocktails

Hello, Rob Raskin of Las Vegas here, bringing you a fun post this week. Whether you are celebrating a special event or you just want to relax with a drink after a long day of hunting, you don’t have to skip out on the cocktails just because you don’t have a liquor store nearby. If you are a homesteader or a survivalist who enjoys a great cocktail, this is yet another thing you’ll be able to do yourself while you are off-grid, provided you have the right supplies, so here is a peek at some of the essentials. And it doesn’t hurt to have a DIY still handy.

 

Whiskey is Quicker

Moonshine is as American as the frontiersmen who once rebelled over the unfair taxation of spirits, and it’s easier to make than you may think. If you can ferment alcohol, then you can do this. You’ll just need some yeast, either fruit or grain, distill water, distill alcohol, and essential oils. With a few supplies like an alcohol hydrometer, a fermentation vessel with a lid, some barrels, and a little research and patience (or a lot), you can take the chill off a winter’s night with your very own whiskey.

 

DIY Vodka

If you have potatoes, then you have vodka. Okay, I will admit there are a few steps in between the two, but they aren’t anything you can’t handle on your homestead. If the worst should happen and there is a social collapse or other disaster, this sought-after beverage will be in short supply and great demand, so it’s worth any survivalists time to learn how to make it, whether you want to drink it yourself or trade or sell it. For this drink you’ll need potatoes, standard malted barley, and a very large pot. It’s really that simple, after you’ve had some practice.

 

The Pirate’s Drink

If pirates can make rum at sea, then you can make it in the wild. To make rum you’ll need molasses, baker’s yeast, distilled water, and sugar. Lots and lots of sugar—as much as two pounds of it! You’ll also need copper couplings and tubing, a pressure cooker, a bucket, and some waterproof sealant. You don’t have to age this in wood barrels, but it will improve the flavor. Rum can take a week or more to make, but when you are enjoying that mojito you’ll understand that it is worth the wait. Although, depending on your circumstances, you may need to skip the ice.

 

 

Remember, it is illegal to distill alcohol in the US at this time, but we never know what the future may hold, and any survivalist knows the importance of being prepared. This is Rob Raskin, and I hope you’ll visit again the next time you need information about going off-grid.

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